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    Lecture, Wed 15 Oct 2014, free entry

    Darwin Suite

    Darwin Suite

    VW Theatre room, interior

    VW Theatre room, interior

     
     

    Contact

    Dr Ian Blomfield

    01227 823697

    Address

    Giles Lane,
    Canterbury,
    CT2 7LX

    Events at this Venue

    date event
    Wed 24 Sep - Sun 19 Oct Kent Eye
    Wed 15 Oct The Battle of the Sexes
    Sat 6 Dec Oysterband

    Details

    The Battle of the Sexes: how sex chromosomes influence human health and disease.

    Dr. James Turner, Division of Stem Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London.

    Most people would readily accept that men and women are different. Although some of these differences, for example in anatomy and biochemistry, are obvious, others are less commonly appreciated. For instance, women suffer from rheumatoid arthritis more often than men, and conversely, men are more commonly diagnosed with autism than women. Why is this the case? The answer is that men and women differ fundamentally in their genetic make-up.

    Genes are carried on chromosomes, and most of these chromosomes are identical between the sexes. However, one particular pair of chromosomes, the aptly-termed “sex chromosomes” is not the same in men and women. Women have two copies of a long, gene rich chromosome called the X chromosome, while men have one X chromosome, and a second, gene-poor, wimpy chromosome called the Y chromosome. As well as influencing disease susceptibility, these sex chromosomes determine whether a human embryo will go on to develop as a boy or a girl, and they have an especially important role in male and female fertility during later life.

    In this presentation, I will explain how and why sex chromosomes appeared in our ancestors, and the benefits and drawbacks that they have for human health. I will also discuss how research into sex chromosomes is represented in the popular media, and how cutting edge research on these unusual chromosomes is creating new potential disease treatments.

    Baby changing facilitiesCash PointCredit cards accepted (no fee)Disabled accessDisabled toilets

    Awarded 'Best University Accommodation for Groups 2011' for a most impressive 4th consecutive year. Readers of Group Travel Organiser magazine vote for the award which was presented to the University by Travel Writer and Broadcaster, Simon Calder.

    Event details

    Dates Times
    Wed 15 Oct 2014 17:00 to 18:00
    Location: Woolf Lecture Theatre.

    Prices

    Free entry

    Location

    Directions

    See location of University of Kent  on Google mapsSee location on Google maps

    Map reference: TR 138596  Lat: 51.29537 Long: 1.06527

    With easy access to the A2/M2, M20, M25, rail and bus links and the Channel Tunnel/Ferry Terminals the university is easily accessible by road, rail and sea.

    Parking: free

    Accessible by Public Transport: 2 miles from Canterbury West station

    Facilities

    • Baby changing facilitiesBaby changing facilities
    • Cash PointCash Point
    • Credit cards accepted (no fee)Credit cards accepted (no fee)
    • Disabled accessDisabled access
    • Disabled toiletsDisabled toilets

    Awarded 'Best University Accommodation for Groups 2011' for a most impressive 4th consecutive year. Readers of Group Travel Organiser magazine vote for the award which was presented to the University by Travel Writer and Broadcaster, Simon Calder.

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