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Roman gods

 

Romans believed in many gods. Their cults arrived with Roman culture in Canterbury, where the Britons already had other gods. The religions gradually merged. Small figurines, for dedication at shrines or home and burial use, were mass-produced from bronze and clay. Parts of what are now France and Germany specialised in hollow-casting local fine white clay in moulds.


Figurines of Roman gods in Canterbury Roman Museum include:

  • Venus, goddess of love and fertility
  • Epona, the horse goddess of fertility and healing, of Celtic origin
  • Dea Nutrix, the Romanised version of a Celtic goddess of fertility and childbirth represented as a seated breastfeeding woman 
  • A bronze figurine that is probably a Genius or personal protective spirit.


There is also a small figure of a bearded male wearing a native Gaulish hooded ‘cucullus’. The figure was a popular one but its identity is unclear. Modelled in terracotta the figurine was originally coated to imitate bronze.

 

Dea Nutrix, the Romanised version of a Celtic goddess of fertility and childbirth

Dea Nutrix, the Romanised version of a Celtic goddess of fertility and childbirth represented as a seated breastfeeding woman.

Follow the Museums on:

Opening Times 

Monday to Sunday 10am to 5pm, closed Christmas Day and Boxing Day. Open New Years Day 12noon to 5pm.

 
 

How to find us

Canterbury Roman Museum
Butchery Lane, CT1 2JR

The impressive pillared entrance is in Butchery Lane and very close to the cathedral. Access to the Roman level via lift, then level access throughout museum.

Phone: 01227 785575
Email: museums@canterbury.gov.uk

 
 

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