search

Anglo-Saxon Kent 

Location: Explorers & Collectors

Antiquarians, then archaeologists, have been exploring Kent since the eighteenth century. Outstanding among their finds have been Anglo-Saxon items dating from the fifth to the eighth centuries, when Kent was an independent, wealthy kingdom with continental connections. At first it was a pagan warrior society but in 597 St Augustine was sent by Pope Gregory to bring Christianity to England, and was welcomed in Canterbury by King Ethelbert and his Frankish Queen, Bertha. The Kingdom of Kent was distinguished for outstanding craftmanship in jewellery, metalwork and glass. Items were also imported from the Continent, from where also came materials, people and ideas.

Items on display include:

  • Square-headed silver-gilt brooch (one of a pair)
  • Cooking pot or bucket with handle
  • Silver disc brooch of Kentish work, set with garnets and decorated with cloisonné work and gold wire filigree
  • Cone glass beaker from a 6th to 7th century cemetery
Silver disc brooch of Kentish work on display at The Beaney Art Museum and Library

Silver disc brooch of Kentish work, set with garnets and decorated with cloisonné work and gold wire filigree. Found at Kings Field, Faversham by John Brent (1808 - 1882), a humanitarian activitist, author and antiquarian who was honorary curator of Canterbury Museum.